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Lead Your Company Like You Are Visiting the Grocery Store

by | Feb 10, 2021 | Company Culture, Entrepreneurship, Leadership

One of the things I dislike most about moving to a new city is getting to know a new grocery store.

I like to move through the store quickly and methodically. My list is written in the order I’ll encounter those items as I walk through the store (veggies first, bakery second, etc.). And you can bet that if pasta isn’t on my list, you won’t find me browsing that aisle. At checkout, I organize my purchases by size and weight. The heavy stuff that the bagger will want to put on the bottom goes first, and soft things like tomatoes and peaches go last.

I don’t feel a compulsive need to shop this way. But as more constraints are put on my time, I find myself naturally seeking out efficiency all over the place—even in the grocery store. It feels good to get in and out of there in half the time it used to take me.

The same way of thinking can be applied to work. What can I do to get the most out of my day? How can I make the experience of work go more smoothly? How can I make sure I complete my most important tasks of the day?

Logic-Based Thinking

I call this concept “logic-based thinking.” It simply means thinking about what you want to accomplish each day and mapping out a logical way to get them done.

It’s a lot like walking through the grocery store, where you could easily get caught up in all the distractions around you, like tasting samples or rethinking your entire meal plan after coming across a particularly beautiful display of brussels sprouts. You could wander through the seasonal aisle and get a jump start buying Halloween candy, or go around helping everyone who can’t reach the top shelves. But if you did all that, you might never leave.

Things like this come up at work all the time. Emails claiming to need attention come through, and you respond. Someone pops in to ask a quick question and leaves 45 minutes later. A new idea is brought up, and you find yourself deep in a research rabbit hole in order to decide if something is worth pursuing.

Start With a Plan

One day, Jairek Robbins, an accomplished performance coach, spoke to the employees of one of my companies. He said, “What we tend to do is shoot an arrow and then go draw a target around it. Then we look at it and call ourselves a good shot.”

That’s exactly what we do when we approach work without a logical plan. We look at all the things we got done, all the fires we put out, and we pat ourselves on the back for a job well done. Meanwhile, all the things we said we would do remain untouched.

Growing a business requires a higher level of thought than that. It requires us to identify the most impactful things we can do each day, to find a way to do them, no matter what, and to delegate everything else.

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